ACS Trend Reports and Census Geography Guide

I recently received my first question from someone who wanted to compare 2005-2007 ACS data with 2008-2010. With the release of the latter, we can make historical comparisons with the three year data for the first time since we have estimates that don’t overlap. We should be able to make some interesting comparisons, since the first set covers the real estate boom years (remember those?) and the second covers the Great Recession. One resource that makes such comparisons relatively painless is over at the Missouri Census Data Center. They’ve put together a really clean and simple interface called the ACS Trends Menu, which allows you to select either two one period estimates or two three period estimates and compare them for several different census geographies – states, counties, MCDs, places, metros, Congressional Districts, PUMAs, and a few others – for the entire US (not just Missouri). The end result is a profile that groups data into the Economic, Demographic, Social, and Housing categories that the Census uses for its Demographic Profile tables. The calculations for change and percent change for the estimates and margins of error are done for you.

Downloading the data is not as straightforward – the links to extract it just brought me some error messages, so it’s still a work in progress. Until then, a simple copy and paste into your spreadsheet of choice will work fine.

ACS Trends Menu

If you like the interface, they’ve created separate ones for downloading profiles from any of the ACS periods or from the 2010 Census. The difference here is that you’re looking at one time frame; not across time periods. The interface and the output are the same, but in these menus you can compare four different geographies at once in one profile. Unlike the Trends reports, both the ACS and 2010 Census profiles have easy, clear cut ways to download the profiles as a PDF or a spreadsheet. If you’re happy with data in a profile format and want an interface that’s a little less confusing to navigate than the American Factfinder, these are all great alternatives (and if you’re building web applications these profiles are MUCH easier to work with – you can easily build permanent links or generate them on the fly).

The US Census Bureau also recently put together a great resource called the Guide to State and Local Census Geography. They provide a census geography overview of each state: 2010 population, land area, bordering states, year of entry into the union, population centroids, and a description of how local government is organized in the state – (i.e. do they have municipal civil divisions or only incorporated cities and unincorporated land, etc). You get counts for every type of geography – how many counties, tracts, ZCTAs, and so on, AND best of all you can download all of this data directly in tab delimited files. Need a list of every county subdivision in a state, with codes, land area, and coordinates? No problem – it’s all there.

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