Archive for the ‘Resources’ Category

Python Geocoding Take 2 – US Addresses

Monday, May 30th, 2016

In my previous post I discussed my recent adventures with geocoding addresses outside the US. In contrast, there are countless options for batch geocoding addresses within the United States. I’ll discuss a few of those options here, but will focus primarily on the US Census Geocoder and a Python script I’ve written to batch match addresses using their API. The code and documentation is available on my lab’s resources page.

A Few Different Options

ESRI’s geocoding services allow you (with an account) to access their geocoding servers through tools in the ArcToolbox, or you can write a script and access them through an API. QGIS has a third-party plugin for accessing Google’s services (2500 records a day free) or the Open Streetmap. You can still do things the old fashioned way, by downloading geocoded street files and creating a matching service.

Alternatively, you can subscribe to any number of commercial or academic services where you can upload a file, do the matching, and download results. For years I’ve used the geocoding services at Texas A&M that allow you to do just that. Their rates are reasonable, or if you’re an academic institution and partner with them (place some links to their service on their website) you can request free credits for doing matches in batches.

The Census Geocoder and API, and a Python Script for Batch Geocoding

The Census Bureau’s TIGER and address files are often used as the foundational layers for building these other services, to which the service providers add refinements and improvements. You can access the Census Bureau’s services directly through the Census Geocoder, where you can match an address one at a time, or you can upload a batch of 1000 records. It returns longitude and latitude coordinates in NAD 83, and you can get names and codes for all the census geographies where the address is located. The service is pretty picky about the structure of the upload file (must be plain text, csv, with an id column and then columns with the address components in a specific order – with no other attributes allowed) but the nice thing is it requires no login and no key. It’s also public domain, so you can do whatever you want with the data you’ve retrieved. A tutorial for using it is available on our lab’s census tutorials page.

census geocoder

They also have an API with some basic documentation. You can match parsed and unparsed addresses, and can even do reverse geocoding. So I took a stab at writing a script to batch process addresses in text-delimited files (csv or txt). Unfortnately, the Census Geocoding API is not one of the services covered by the Python Geocoder that I mentioned in my previous post, but I did find another third party module called censusgeocode which provides a thin wrapper you can use. I incorporated that module into my Python 3 script, which I wrote as a function that takes the following inputs:

census_geocode(datafile,delim,header,start,addcol)
(str,str,str,int,list[int]) -> files

  • datafile – this is the name of the file you want to process (file name and extension). If you place the geocode_census_funct.py file in the same directory as your data file, then you just need to provide the name of the file. Otherwise, you need to provide the full path to the file.
  • delim – this is the delimiter or character that separates the values in your data file. Common delimiters includes commas ‘,’, tabs ‘\t’, and pipes ‘|’.
  • header – here you specify whether your file has a header row, i.e. column names. Enter ‘y’ or ‘yes’ if it does, ‘n’ or ‘no’ if it doesn’t.
  • start – type 0 to specify that you want to start reading the file from the beginning. If you were previously running the script and it broke and exited for some reason, it provides an index number where it stopped reading; if that’s the case you can provide that index number here, to pick up where you left off.
  • addcol – provide a list that indicates the position number of the columns that contain the address components in your data file. For an unparsed address, you provide just one position number. For a parsed address, you provide 4 positions: address, city, state, and ZIP code. Whether you provide 1 or 4, the numbers must be supplied in brackets, as the function requires a Python list.

You can open the script in IDLE, run it to load it into memory, and then type the function with the necessary parameters in the shell to execute it. Some examples:

  • A tab-delimited, unparsed address file with a header that’s stored in the same folder as the script. Start from the beginning and the address is in the 2nd column: census_geocode('my_addresses.txt','\t','y',0,[2])
  • A comma-delimited, parsed address file with no header that’s stored in the same folder as the script. Start from the beginning and the addresses are in the 2nd through 5th columns: census_geocode('addresses_to_match.csv',',','n',0,[2,3,4,5])
  • A comma-delimited, unparsed address file with a header that’s not in the same folder as the script. We ran the file before and it stopped at index 250, so restart there – the address is in the 3rd column: census_geocode('C:\address_data\data1.csv',',','y',250,[3])

The beginning of the script “sets the table”: we read the address columns into variables, create the output files (one for matches, one for non-matches, and a summary report), and we handle whether or not there’s a header row. For reading the file I used Python’s CSV module. Typically I don’t use this module, as I find it’s much simpler to do the basic: read a line in, split it on a delimiter, strip whitespace, read it into a list, etc. But in this case the CSV module allows you to handle a wider array of input files; if the input data was a csv and there happened to be commas embedded in the values themselves, the CSV module easily takes care of it; if you ignore it, the parsing would get thrown off for that record.

Handling Exceptions and Server Errors

In terms of expanding my skills, the new things I had to learn were exception handling and control flows. Since the censusgeocoding module is a thin wrapper, it had no built in mechanism for retrying a match a certain number of times if the server timed out. This is an absolute necessity, because the census server often times out, is busy, or just hiccups, returning a generic error message. I had already learned how to handle crashes in my earlier geocoding experiments, where I would write the script to match and write a record one by one as it went along. It would try to do a match, but if any error was raised, it would exit that loop cleanly, write a report, and all would be saved and you could pick up where you left off. But in this case, if that server non-response error was returned I didn’t want to give up – I wanted to keep trying.

So on the outside there is a loop to try and do a match, unless any error happens, then exit the loop cleanly and wrap up. But inside there is another try loop, where we try to do a match but if we get that specific server error, continue: go back to the top of that for loop and try again. That loop begins with While True – if we successfully get to the end, then we start with the next record. If we get that server error we stay in that While loop and keep trying until we get a match, or we run out of tries (5) and write as a non-match.

error handling

In doing an actual match, the script does a parsed or unparsed match based on user input. But there was another sticking point; in some instances the API would return a matched result (we got coordinates!), but some of the objects that it returned were actually errors because of some java problem (failed to get the tract number or county name – here’s an error message instead!) To handle this, we have a for i in range loop. If we have a matched record and we don’t have a status message (that indicates an error) then we move along and grab all the info we need – the coordinates, and all the census geography where that coordinate falls, and write it out, and then that for loop ends with a break. But if we receive an error message we continue – go back to the top of that loop and try doing the match again. After 3 tries we give up and write no match.

Figuring all that out took a while – where do these loops go and what goes in them, how do I make sure that I retry a record rather than passing over it to the next one, etc. Stack Exchange to the rescue! Difference between continue, pass and break, returning to the beginning of a loop, breaking out of a nested loop, and retrying after an exception. The rest is pretty straightforward. Once the matching is done we close the files, and write out a little report that tells us how many matches we got versus fails. The Census Geocoder via the API is pretty unforgiving; it either finds a match, or it doesn’t. There is no match score or partial matching, and it doesn’t give you a ZIP Code or municipal centroid if it can’t find the address. It’s all or nothing; if you have partial or messy addresses or PO Boxes, it’s pretty much guaranteed that you won’t get matches.

There’s no limit on number of matches, but I’ve built in a number of pauses so I’m not hammering the server too hard – one second after each match, 5 seconds after every 1000 matches, a couple seconds before retrying after an error. Your mileage will vary, but the other day I did about 2500 matches in just under 2 hours. Their server can be balky at times – in some cases I’ve encountered only a couple problems for every 100 records, but on other occasions there were hang-ups on every other record. For diagnostic purposes the script prints every 100th record to the screen, as well as any problems it encountered (see pic below). If you launch a process and notice the server is hanging on every other record and repeatedly failing to get matches, it’s probably best to bail out and come back later. Recently, I’ve noticed fewer problems during off-peak times: evenings and weekends.

Script Running

Wrap Up

The script and the documentation are posted on our labs resources page, for all to see and use – you just have to install the third party censusgeocode module before using it. When would you want to use this? Well, if you need something that’s free, this is a good choice. If you have batches in the 10ks to do, this would be a good solution. If you’re in the 100ks, it could be a feasible solution – one of my colleagues has confirmed that he’s used the script to match about 40k addresses, so the service is up to the task for doing larger jobs.

If you have less than a couple thousand records, you might as well use their website and upload files directly. If you’re pushing a million or more – well, you’ll probably want to set up something locally. PostGIS has a TIGER module that lets you do desktop matching if you need to go into the millions, or you simply have a lot to do on a consistent basis. The excellent book PostGIS in Action has a chapter dedicated to to this.

In some cases, large cities or counties may offer their own geocoding services, and if you know you’re just going to be doing matches for your local area those sources will probably have greater accuracy, if they’re adding value with local knowledge. For example, my results with NYC’s geocoding API for addresses in the five boroughs are better than the Census Bureau’s and is customized for local quirks; for example, I can pass in a borough name instead of a postal city and ZIP Code, and it’s able to handle those funky addresses in Queens that have dashes and similar names for multiple streets (35th st, 35th ave, 35th dr…). But for a free, public domain service that requires no registration, no keys, covers the entire country, and is the foundation for just about every US geocoding platform out there, the Census Geocoder is hard to beat.

Average Distance to Public Libraries in the US

Monday, February 22nd, 2016

A few months ago I had a new article published in LISR, but given the absurd restrictions of academic journal publishing I’m not allowed to publicly post the article, and have to wait 12 months before sharing my post-print copy. It is available via your local library if they have a subscription to the Science Direct database (you can also email me to request a copy). I am sharing some of the un-published state-level data that was generated for the project here.

Citation and Abstract

Regional variations in average distance to public libraries in the United States
F. Donnelly
Library & Information Science Research
Volume 37, Issue 4, October 2015, Pages 280–289
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.lisr.2015.11.008

Abstract

“There are substantive regional variations in public library accessibility in the United States, which is a concern considering the civic and educational roles that libraries play in communities. Average population-weighted distances and the total population living within one mile segments of the nearest public library were calculated at a regional level for metropolitan and non-metropolitan areas, and at a state level. The findings demonstrate significant regional variations in accessibility that have been persistent over time and cannot be explained by simple population distribution measures alone. Distances to the nearest public library are higher in the South compared to other regions, with statistically significant clusters of states with lower accessibility than average. The national average population-weighted distance to the nearest public library is 2.1 miles. While this supports the use of a two-mile buffer employed in many LIS studies to measure library service areas, the degree of variation that exists between regions and states suggests that local measures should be applied to local areas.”

Purpose

I’m not going to repeat all the findings, but will provide some context.

As a follow-up to my earlier work, I was interested in trying an alternate approach for measuring public library spatial equity. I previously used the standard container approach – draw a buffer at some fixed distance around a library and count whether people are in or out, and as an approximation for individuals I used population centroids for census tracts. In my second approach, I used straight-line distance measurements from census block groups (smaller than tracts) to the nearest public library so I could compare average distances for regions and states; I also summed populations for these areas by calculating the percentage of people that lived within one-mile rings of the nearest library. I weighted the distances by population, to account for the fact that census areas vary in population size (tracts and block groups are designed to fall within an ideal population range – for block groups it’s between 600 and 3000 people).

Despite the difference in approach, the outcome was similar. Using the earlier approach (census tract centroids that fell within a library buffer that varied from 1 to 3 miles based on urban or rural setting), two-thirds of Americans fell within a “library service area”, which means that they lived within a reasonable distance to a library based on standard practices in LIS research. Using the latest approach (using block group centroids and measuring the distance to the nearest library) two-thirds of Americans lived within two miles of a public library – the average population weighted distance was 2.1 miles. Both studies illustrate that there is a great deal of variation by geographic region – people in the South consistently lived further away from public libraries compared to the national average, while people in the Northeast lived closer. Spatial Autocorrelation (LISA) revealed a cluster of states in the South with high distances and a cluster in the Northeast with low distances.

The idea in doing this research was not to model actual travel behavior to measure accessibility. People in rural areas may be accustomed to traveling greater distances, public transportation can be a factor, people may not visit the library that’s close to their home for several reasons, measuring distance along a network is more precise than Euclidean distance, etc. The point is that libraries are a public good that provide tangible benefits to communities. People that live in close proximity to a public library are more likely to reap the benefits that it provides relative to those living further away. Communities that have libraries will benefit more than communities that don’t. The distance measurements serve as a basic metric for evaluating spatial equity. So, if someone lives more than six miles away from a library that does not mean that they don’t have access; it does means they are less likely to utilize it or realize it’s benefits compared to someone who lives a mile or two away.

Data

I used the 2010 Census at the block group level, and obtained the location of public libraries from the 2010 IMLS. I improved the latter by geocoding libraries that did not have address-level coordinates, so that I had street matches for 95% of the 16,720 libraries in the dataset. The tables that I’m providing here were not published in the original article, but were tacked on as supplementary material in appendices. I wanted to share them so others could incorporate them into local studies. In most LIS research the prevailing approach for measuring library service areas is to use a buffer of 1 to 2 miles for all locations. Given the variation between states, if you wanted to use the state-average for library planning in your own state you can consider using these figures.

To provide some context, the image below shows public libraries (red stars) in relation to census block group centroids (white circles) for northern Delaware (primarily suburban) and surrounding areas (mix of suburban and rural). The line drawn between the Swedesboro and Woodstown libraries in New Jersey is 5-miles in length. I used QGIS and Spatialite for most of the work, along with Python for processing the data and Geoda for the spatial autocorrelation.

Map Example - Northern Delaware

The three tables I’m posting on the resources page are for states: one counts the 2010 Census population within one to six mile rings of the nearest public library, the second is the percentage of the total state population that falls within that ring, and the third is a summary table that calculates the mean and population-weighted distance to the nearest library by state. One set of tables is formatted text (for printing or just looking up numbers) while the other set are CSV files that you can use in a spreadsheet. I’ve included a metadata record with some methodological info, but you can read the full details in the article.

In the article itself I tabulated and examined data at a broader, regional level (Northeast, Midwest, South, and West), and also broke it down into metropolitan and non-metropolitan areas for the regions. Naturally people that live in non-metropolitan areas lived further away, but the same regional patterns existed: more people in the South in both metro and non-metro areas lived further away compared to their counterparts in other parts of the country. This weekend I stumbled across this article in the Washington Post about troubles in the Deep South, and was struck by how these maps mirrored the low library accessibility maps in my past two articles.

Review of The Census Reporter

Monday, February 8th, 2016

Picking up where I left off from my previous post (gee – welcome to 2016!) I thought I’d give a brief review of another census resource, The Census Reporter at http://censusreporter.org/.

The Census Reporter was created to make it easier for journalists to write stories using census data. To that end, they’ve created a really slick and easy to use web site that makes the data accessible and fun to explore. From the homepage you have three ways of diving into the data: you can pull up a profile by typing in the name of a place, you can enter an address and explore places that contain that address, or you can explore tables by topic.

Census Reporter Homepage

First, the place-based approach. You can type in a named place, like a state, county, or a census place (incorporated cities and towns, or census designated places) to get started. This will give you a selection of data from the most recent release of the American Community Survey. For larger areas where the data is available, it gives you 1-year ACS data by default; otherwise you get the latest 5-year data.

You’re presented with a map of the location at the top, and a series of attractive looking graphs and charts sorted by the demographic profile table source – social, economic, housing, and demographic. If you hover over a data point in a table it gives you some geographic context by comparing this place’s value with that of larger places where it’s contained. For example, if I search for Philadelphia I can hover over the chart to get the value for the Philly metro area and the State of Pennsylvania. I can click a link below each chart to open the full table, which includes both estimates and margins of error. There are small links for viewing the table by itself on a separate page (which also gives you the ability to download it) and for embedding the chart in a website.

Census Reporter Chart and Table

Viewing the table gives you additional options, like adding additional places for comparison, or subdividing the place into smaller areas for comparison. So if I’m looking at Philadelphia, I can break it down into tracts, block groups, or ZIP Codes. From there I can toggle away from the table view to view a map or a distribution bar to explore that variable by individual geographies.

View Data by Sub-Areas, Distribution Bars

The place-based search is great at allowing you to drill down either by topic or by these smaller geographies. But if you wanted to access a fuller range of geographies like congressional districts or PUMAs, it seems easier to do an address-based search. Back on the homepage, selecting the address button and typing in an address brings you to a map with the address pin-pointed, and on the left you can choose any geography that encloses that address. Once you do that, you get a profile for that geography and can start doing the same sorts of operations for changing the topics or tables, or adding or subdividing geographies for comparison.

Address Search

The topic-based search lets you search just by topic and then figure out the geography piece later. Of the three types of searches this one is the toughest, given the sheer number of tables and cross-tabulations. You can click on a link for a general topic to narrow things down a bit before beginning a search.

In downloading the data you have a variety of useful options: CSV, Excel, GeoJSON, KML, and shapefiles. So in theory you can download data that’s readily mappable – in practice I wasn’t able to download a shapefile, but could grab a KML or GeoJson and was able to visualize it in QGIS. One challenge in downloading any of the files is that the column names use the identifier codes, and the actual names of the variables aren’t included in the download format you choose – they’re included in a json file. So you can use that for reference, but it can’t be readily incorporated into the table.

So – where would this resource fall within the pantheon of US Census data resources? I think it’s great for accessing and, especially, visualizing profiles (profile = lots of data for one place) from the most recent ACS releases. It’s easy to use and succeeds at making the data interesting; for that reason I certainly would incorporate it into undergraduate courses where I’m introducing data. The ability to embed the charts into websites is certainly a bonus, and they deserve a big thumbs up for incorporating the margin of error data, rather than hiding or discarding it like other resources do.

The ability to create and view comparison tables (comparison = one piece of data for many places) is good – select an area and then break it down – but not as strong as the profile options. If you want to get a profile for a non-named place like a tract, ZIP Code, or PUMA you can’t do that from the profile search. You can do an address search and back out (if you know an address for that you’re interested in) or you can drill down by topic, which lets you search by summary area in addition to named places.

For users who need to download a lot of data, or for folks who need datasets that aren’t the most recent ACS release, this resource isn’t the place to go. The focus here is on providing the data in an easy and compelling way, as is. In viewing the profiles, it’s not clear if you can choose 5-year data over 1-year data for places where both datasets are available – even for large geographic areas with high population, sometimes it’s preferable to use the 5-year data to take advantage of the smaller margins of error. I also didn’t see an option for choosing decennial census data.

In short, this resource is well-designed and definitely worth exploring. It seems clear why this would be a go-to source for journalists, but it can be for many others as well.

The New NYC Census Factfinder

Wednesday, September 9th, 2015

As I’m updating my presentations and handouts for the new academic year, I’m taking two new census resources for a test drive. I’ll talk about the first resource in this post.

The NYC Department of City Planning has been collating census data and publishing it for the City for quite some time. They’ve created neighborhood tabulation areas (NTAs) by aggregating census tracts, so that they could publish more reliable ACS data for small areas (since the margins of error for census tracts can be quite large) and so that New Yorkers have data for neighborhood-like areas that they would recognize. The City also publishes PUMA-level data that’s associated with the City’s Community Districts, as well as borough and city-level data. All of this information is available in a large series of Excel spreadsheets or PDFs in the form of comparison tables for each dataset.

The Department of Planning also created the NYC Census Factfinder, a web-mapping interface that let’s users explore census tract and NTA level data profiles. You could plug in an address or click on the map and get a 2010 Census profile, or a demographic change profile that showed shifts between the 2000 and 2010 Census.

pic1_factfinder

It was a nice application, but they’ve just made a series of updates that make it infinitely better:

  1. They’ve added the American Community Survey data from 2009-2013, and you can view the four demographic profile tables (demographics, social, economic, and housing) for tracts and NTAs.
  2. Unlike many other sources, they do publish the margin of error for all of the ACS data, which is immensely important. Estimates that have a high margin of error (as defined by a coefficient of variation) appear in grey instead of solid black. While the actual margins are not shown by default, you can simply click the Show radio button to turn on the Reliability data.
  3. Tracts or neighborhoods can be compared to the City as a whole or to an individual borough by selecting the drop down for the column header.
  4. This is especially cool – if you’re viewing census tracts you can use the select pointer and hold down the Control key (Command key on a Mac) to select multiple tracts, and then the data tables will aggregate the tract-level data for you (so essentially you can build your own neighborhoods). What’s noteworthy here is that it also calculates the new margins of error for all of the derived estimates, AND it even calculates new medians and averages with margins of error! This is something that I’ve never seen in any other application.
  5. In addition to searching for locations by address, you can hit the search type drop down and you have a number of additional options like Intersection, Place of Interest, and even Subway Stations.

nyc_factfinder_table

There are a few quirks:

  1. I had trouble viewing the map in Firefox – this isn’t a consistent problem but something I noticed today when I went exploring. Hopefully something temporary that will be corrected. Had no problems in IE.
  2. If you want to click to select an area on the map, you have to hit the select button first (the arrow beside the zoom slider and print button) and then click on your area to select it. Just clicking on the map without hitting select first won’t do much – it will just highlight the area and tell you it’s name. Clicking the arrow button turns it blue and allows you to select features, clicking it again turns it white and lets you identify features and pan around the map.
  3. factfinder_buttons

  4. The one bummer is that there isn’t a way to download any of the profiles – particularly the ones you custom design by selecting tracts. Hitting the Get Data button takes you out of the Factfinder and back to the page with all of the pre-compiled comparison tables. You can print the table out to a PDF for presentation purposes, but if you want a data-friendly format you’ll have to highlight and select the table on the page, copy, and paste into a spreadsheet.

These are just small quibbles that I’m sure will eventually be addressed. As is stands, with the addition of the ACS and the new features they’ve added, I’ll definitely be integrating the NYC Census Factfinder into my presentations and will be revising my NYC Neighborhood Census data handout to add it as a source. It’s unique among resources in that it provides NTA-level data in addition to tract data, has 2000 and 2010 historical change and the latest 5-year ACS (with margins of error) in one application, and allows you to build your own neighborhoods to aggregate tract data WITH new margins of error for all derived estimates. It’s well-suited for users who want basic Census demographic profiles for neighborhood-like areas in NYC.

Article on Processing Government Data With Python

Thursday, August 28th, 2014

Last month I had an article published in the code{4}lib journal, about a case study using Python to process IRS data on tax-exempt organizations (non-profits). It includes a working Python script that can be used by any one who wishes to make a place-based extract of that dataset for their geographic area of interest. The script utilizes the ZIP to ZCTA masterfile that I’ve mentioned in a previous post, and I include a discussion on wrestling with ZIP Code data. Both the script and the database are included in the download files at the bottom of the article.

I also provide a brief explanation of using OpenRefine to clean data using their text facet tools. One thing I forgot to mention in the article is that after you apply your data fixes with OpenRefine, it records the history. So if you have to process an update of the same file in the future (which I’ll have to do repeatedly), you can simply re-apply all the fixes you made in the past (which are saved in a JSON file).

While the article is pragmatic in nature, I did make an attempt to link this example to the bigger picture of data librarianship, advocating that data librarians can work to add value to datasets for their users, rather than simply pointing them to unrefined resources that many won’t be able to use.

The citation and link:

Donnelly, F. P. (2014). Processing government data: ZIP Codes, Python, and OpenRefine. code{4}lib Journal, 25 (2014-07-21). http://journal.code4lib.org/articles/9652.

As always the journal has a great mix of case studies, and this issue included an article on geospatial metadata.

While I’ve used Python quite a bit, this is the first time that I’ve written anything serious that I’ve released publicly. If there are ways I could improve it, I’d appreciate your feedback. Other than a three-day workshop I took years ago, I’m entirely self-taught and seldom have the opportunity to bounce ideas off people for this type of work. I’ve disabled the blog comments here a long time ago, but feel free to send me an email. If there’s enough interest I’ll do a follow-up post with the suggestions – mail AT gothos DOT info.

Some QGIS Odds and Ends

Thursday, July 3rd, 2014

My colleague Joe Paccione recently finished a QGIS tutorial on working with raster data. My introductory tutorial for the GIS Practicum gives only cursory treatment to rasters, so this project was initially conceived to give people additional opportunities to learn about working with them. It focuses on elevation modeling and uses DEMs and DRGs to introduce tiling and warping, and creating hillshades and contour lines.

topo_contour

The tutorial was written using QGIS 2.0 and was tested with version 2.4; thus it’s readily usable with any 2.x version of QGIS. With the rapid progression of QGIS my introductory tutorial for the workshop is becoming woefully outdated, having been written in version 1.8. It’s going to take me quite a while to update (among other things, the image for every darn button has changed) but I plan to have a new version out sometime in the fall, but probably not at the beginning of semester. Since I have a fair amount of work to do any way, I’m going to rethink all of the content and exercises. Meanwhile, Lex Berman at Harvard has updated his wonderfully clear and concise tutorial to Q version 2.x.

The workshops have been successful for turning people on to open source GIS on my campus, to the point were people are using it and coming back to teach me new things – especially when it comes to uncovering useful plugins:

  • I had a student who needed to geocode a bunch of addresses, but since many of them were international I couldn’t turn to my usual geocoding service at Texas A & M. While I’ve used the MMQGIS plugin for quite a while (it has an abundance of useful tools), I NEVER NOTICED that it includes a geocoding option that acts as a GUI for accessing both the Google and Open Streetmap API for geocoding. He discovered it, and it turned out quite well for him.
  • I was helping a prof who was working with a large point file of street signs, and we discovered a handy plugin called Points2One that allowed us to take those points and turn them into lines based on an attribute the points held in common. In this case every sign on a city block shared a common id that allowed us to create lines representing each side of the street on each block.
  • After doing some intersect and difference geoprocessing with shapefiles I was ending up with some dodgy results – orphaned nodes and lines that had duplicate attributes with good polygons. If I was in a database, an easy trick to find these duplicates would be to run a select query where you group by ID and count them, and anything with a count more than two are duplicates – but this was a shapefile. Luckily there’s a handy plugin called Group Stats that lets you create pivot tables, so I used that to do a summary count and identified the culprits. The plugin allowed me to select all the features that matched my criteria of having an id count of 2 or more, so I could eyeball them in the map view and the attribute table. I calculated the geometry for all the features and sorted the selected ones, revealing that all the duplicates had infinitesimally small areas. Then it was a simple matter of select and delete.
  • Notes from the Open Geoportal National Summit

    Wednesday, October 30th, 2013

    This past weekend I had the privilege of attending the Open Geoportal (OGP) National Summit in Boston, hosted by Tufts University and funded by the Sloan Foundation. The Open Geoportal (OGP) is a map-based search engine that allows users to discover and retrieve geospatial data from many repositories. The OGP serves as the front-end of a three-tiered system that includes a spatial database (like PostGIS) at the back and some middleware (Like OpenLayers) to communicate between the two.

    Users navigate via a web map (Google by default but you can choose other options), and as they change the extent by panning or zooming a list of available spatial layers appears in a table of contents beside the map. Hovering over a layer in the contents reveals a bounding box that indicates its spatial extent. Several algorithms determine the ranking order of the results based on the spatial intersection of bounding boxes with the current map view. For instance, layers that are completely contained in the map view have priority over those that aren’t, and layers that have their geographic center in the view are also pushed higher in the results. Non-spatial search filters for date, data type, institution, and keywords help narrow down a search. Of course, the quality of the results is completely dependent on the underlying metadata for the layers, which is stored in the various repositories.

    opengeoport_tufts

    The project was pioneered by Tufts, Harvard, and MIT , and now about a dozen other large research universities are actively working with it, and others are starting to experiment. The purpose of the summit was to begin creating a cohesive community to manage and govern the project, and to increase and outline the possibilities for collaborating across institutions. At the back end, librarians and metadata experts are loading layers and metadata into their repositories; metadata creation is an exacting and time-consuming process, but the OGP will allow institutions to share their metadata records in the hope of avoiding duplicated effort. The OGP also allows for the export of detailed spatial metadata from FGDC and ISO to MODS and MARC, so that records for the spatial layers can be exported to other content management systems and library catalogs.

    The summit gave metadata experts the opportunity to discuss best practices for metadata creation and maintenance, in the hopes of providing a consistent pool of records that can be shared; it also gave software developers the chance to lay out their road map for how they’ll function as an open source project (the OGP community could look towards the GeoNetwork opensource project, a forerunner in spatial metadata and search that’s used in Europe and by many international organizations). Series of five-minute talks called Ignite sessions gave librarians and developers the ability to share the work they were doing at their institutions, either with OGP in particular or with metadata and spatial search in general, which sparked further discussion.

    The outcome of all the governance, resource sharing, and best practices discussions are available on a series of pages dedicated to the summit, on the opengeoportal.org project website. You can also experiment with the OGP via http://geodata.tufts.edu/, Tuft’s gateway to their repository. As you search for data you can identify which repository the data is coming from (Tufts, Harvard, or MIT) based on the little icon that appears beside each layer name. Public datasets (like US census layers) can be downloaded by anyone, while copyrighted sets that the schools’ purchased for their users require authentication.

    OGP is a simple yet elegant open source project that operates under OGC standards and is awesome for spatial search, but the real gem here is the community of people that are forming around it. I was blown away by the level of expertise, dedication, and over all professionalism that each of the librarians, information specialists, and software developers exuded, via the discussions and particularly by the examples of the work they were doing at their institutions. Beyond just creating software, this project is poised to enhance the quality and compatibility of spatial metadata to keep our growing pile of geospatial stuff find-able.

    Article on Working With the American Community Survey

    Monday, June 17th, 2013

    I’ve got another article that’s just hit the presses. In this one I discuss the American Community Survey: how it differs from the Decennial Census, when you should use it versus other summary data sets, how to work with the different period estimates, and how to create derived estimates and calculate their margins of error. For that last piece I’ve essentially done an extended version of this old post on Excel formulas, with several different and updated examples.

    The article is available via Emerald’s journal database. If you don’t have access to it from your library feel free to contact me and I’ll send you a copy (can’t share this one freely online).

    Title: The American Community Survey: practical considerations for researchers
    Author(s): Francis P. Donnelly
    Citation: Francis P. Donnelly, (2013) “The American Community Survey: practical considerations for researchers”, Reference Services Review, Vol. 41 Iss: 2, pp.280 – 297
    Keywords: American Community Survey, Census, Census geography, Data handling, Decennial census, Demographic data, Government data processing, Government information, Margins of error, Sample-based data, United States of America, US Census Bureau
    Article type: Technical paper
    DOI: 10.1108/00907321311326228 (Permanent URL)
    Publisher: Emerald Group Publishing Limited

    The Geography of US Public Libraries

    Monday, March 18th, 2013

    Last month my article on the geographic disribution of US public libraries was pre-published online in JOLIS, with a print date pending. I can’t share this one freely on-line, so if you don’t have access via a library database (Sage Journals, ERIC, various LIS dbs) you can contact me if you’re interested in getting a copy.

    Title: The geographic distribution of United States public libraries : An analysis of locations and service areas
    Author: Francis P. Donnelly
    Journal: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science (JOLIS)
    Year: 2014, Volume 46, Issue 2, Pages 110-129
    ISSN: 0961-0006
    DOI: 10.1177/0961000612470276
    Publisher: Sage

    Abstract

    This article explores the geography of public libraries in the United States. The distribution of libraries is examined using maps and spatial statistics to analyze spatial patterns. Methods for delineating and studying library service areas used in previous LIS research are modified and applied using geographic information systems to study variations in library accessibility by state and by socio-economic group at the national level. A history of library development is situated within the broader economic and demographic history of the US to provide insight to contemporary patterns, and Louis Round Wilson’s Geography of Reading is used as a focal point for studying historical trends. Findings show that while national library coverage is extensive, the percentage of the population that lives in a library’s geographic service area varies considerably by region and state, with Southern and Western states having lower values than Northeastern and Midwestern states.

    Keywords

    Geographic information systems, geography, public libraries, service areas, spatial equity, United States

    This OCLC flier (How Public Libraries Stack Up) piqued my interest in public libraries as community resources, public goods, and placemaking institutions. If the presence of a public library brings so much value to a community, then by extension the lack of a public library could leave a community at a disadvantage. This led to the next set of logical questions: how are libraries distributed across the country, and which people and communties are being served and which aren’t?

    I took a few different approaches to answer these questions. The first approach was to use (and learn) spatial statistics so the overall distribution could be characterized, and the second was to use spatial extraction methods to select census areas and populations that were within the service areas of each library, to see differences in how populations were served and to study these differences across different states. The LIS literature is rich with research that uses GIS to study library use, so I provide a thorough summary of what’s come before. Then after I had the results I spent a good deal of time researching how the contemporary pattern came to be, and coupled the research on the history of public libraries with the broader history of urban and economic development in the United States.

    I had a few unstated motives – one of them was to learn spatial statistics, with the help of: OpenGeoda and its documentation, this excellent book on Spatial Data Analysis (for theory), these great examples from Spatial Justice, and invaluable advice from Deborah Balk, a Professor of Spatial Demography with the CUNY Institute for Demographic Research.

    One of my other goals was to use only open source software – QGIS, GRASS, and OpenGeoda, which was also a success. Although in my next study I’ll probably rely on QGIS and Spatialite; I found I was doing a lot of attribute data crunching using the SQLite Manager, since the attributes of GRASS vectors can be stored in SQLite, and I could probably save time (and frustration) by using Spatialite’s features instead. I did get to learn a lot about GRASS, but for my purposes it was overkill and I would have been just fine with a spatial database. I was definetely able to sharpen my Python skills, as processing the American Community Survey data for every census tract in the US manually would have been crazy.

    In a project this size there are always some pieces that end up on the cutting room floor, so I thought I’d share one here – a dot map that shows where all 16,700 public libraries are. In the article I went with a county choropleth map to show the distribution, because I was doing other county-level stuff and because the dimension restrictions on the graphic made it a more viable option. The dot map reveals that libraries are typically where people are, except that the south looks emptier and the midwest fuller than it should be, if libraries were in fact evenly distributed by population. As my research shows – they’re not.

    US Public Libraries

    NYC Geodatabase in Spatialite

    Wednesday, February 6th, 2013

    I spent much of the fall semester and winter interim compiling and creating the NYC geodatabase (nyc_gdb), a desktop geodatabase resource for doing basic mapping and analysis at a neighborhood level – PUMAs, ZIP Codes / ZCTAs, and census tracts. There were several motivations for doing this. First and foremost, as someone who is constantly introducing new people to GIS it’s a pain sending people to a half dozen different websites to download shapefiles and process basic features and data before actually doing a project. By creating this resource I hoped to lower the hurdles a bit for newcomers; eventually they still need to learn about the original sources and data processing, but this gives them a chance to experiment and see the possibilities of GIS before getting into nitty gritty details.

    Second, for people who are already familiar with GIS and who have various projects to work on (like me) this saves a lot of duplicated effort, as the db provides a foundation to build on and saves the trouble of starting from scratch each time.

    Third, it gave me something new to learn and will allow me to build a second part to my open source GIS workshops. I finally sat down and hammered away with Spatialite (went through the Spatialite Cookbook from start to finish) and learned spatial SQL, so I could offer a resource that’s open source and will compliment my QGIS workshop. I was familiar with the Access personal geodatabases in ArcGIS, but for the most part these serve as simple containers. With the ability to run all the spatial SQL operations, Spatialite expands QGIS functionality, which was something I was really looking for.

    My original hope was to create a server-based PostGIS database, but at this point I’m not set up to do that on my campus. I figured Spatialite was a good alternative – the basic operations and spatial SQL commands are relatively the same, and I figured I could eventually scale up to PostGIS when the time comes.

    I also created an identical, MS Access version of the database for ArcGIS users. Once I got my features in Spatialite I exported them all out as shapefiles and imported them all via ArcCatalog – not too arduous as I don’t have a ton of features. I used the SQLite ODBC driver to import all of my data tables from SQLite into Access – that went flawlessly and was a real time saver; it just took a little bit of time to figure out how to set up (but this blog post helped).

    The databases are focused on NYC features and resources, since that’s what my user base is primarily interested in. I purposefully used the Census TIGER files as the base, so that if people wanted to expand the features to the broader region they easily could. I spent a good deal of time creating generalized layers, so that users would have the primary water / coastline and large parks and wildlife areas as reference features for thematic maps, without having every single pond and patch of grass to clutter things up. I took several features (schools, subway stations, etc) from the City and the MTA that were stored in tables and converted them to point features so they’re readily useable.

    Given that focus, it’s primarily of interest to NYC folks, but I figured it may be useful for others who wish to experiment with Spatialite. I assumed that most people who would be interested in the database would not be familiar with this format, so I wrote a tutorial that covers the database and it’s features, how to add and map data in QGIS, how to work with the data and do SQL / spatial SQL in the Spatialite GUI, and how to map data in ArcGIS using the Access Geodb. It’s Creative Commons, Attribution, Non-Commercial, Share-alike, so feel free to give it a try.

    I spent a good amount of time building a process rather than just a product, so I’ll be able to update the db twice a year, as city features (schools, libraries, hospitals, transit) change and new census data (American Community Survey, ZIP Business Patterns) is released. Many of the Census features, as well as the 2010 Census data, will be static until 2020.


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