Posts Tagged ‘2010 Census’

2010 Census Redistricting Data

Sunday, April 17th, 2011

The Redistricting Summary Data [P.L. 94-171] from the 2010 Census has all been published for the nation, states, counties, and places, and is available via the new American Factfinder. The redistricting data includes basic demographic data: total population, race, Hispanic or Latino origin, and number of housing units occupied and vacant. Data is available down to census blocks and is available for most (but not all – no ZCTAs or PUMAs) geographies.

If you don’t want all the data for a state, don’t want to slog through the Factfinder, and are comfortable working with large text files, you can FTP the summary data from the Redistricting Data homepage. If you want basic summary data for states, counties, and places and don’t want to fuss with the Factfinder or text files, you can download Excel spreadsheets from the Redistricting Data Press Kit. They also have some pdf / jpg maps showing county level population and population change, plus interactive map widgets like the one below for the country and for each state. 2010 Redistricting TIGER Shapefiles have also been released for geographies included in the redistricting dataset.

The full 2010 Census for all geographies will be released throughout this summer and into the fall in Summary File 1 [SF1]. Stay tuned.

Some 2010 Census Updates

Monday, February 7th, 2011

Some geography updates to pass along regarding new US Census data:

  • The Census has released a few 2010 map widgets that you can embed in web pages. One shows population change, density, and apportionment for the whole country at the state level, while the other shows population, race, and Hispanic change for states at the county level. As of this post only four states are ready (LA, MS, NJ, and VA) but they’ll be adding the rest once they’re available.
  • The 2010 TIGER Line Files are starting to be released; they’ve changed the download interface a little bit based on user feedback. Most summary levels / geographic areas are available; some (like ZIP Codes and PUMAs) will be released later this year.
  • They’re also rolling out the new interface for the American Factfinder; currently you can get 2000 Census data, some population estimates, and the 2010 Census data as it becomes available. Other datasets like the American Community Survey and Economic Census will be added over time. Some maps and gov docs librarians have expressed concerned about the change – apparently when you download the data from the new interface the FIPS codes are not “ready to go” for joining to shapefiles; there’s one long geo id that has to be parsed. The other concern is that the 1990 Census won’t be carried over into the new interface at all. The original American Factfinder is slated to come down towards the end of this year.

Track 2010 Census Participation Rates

Tuesday, March 30th, 2010

The 2010 Census is in full swing – the target date of April 1st is coming up soon. I mailed my form back last week. If you’re curious as to how many others have mailed theirs back, check out the bureau’s interactive Take 10 Map. Built on top of a Google Map interface, it allows you to track participation rates by state, county, place, reservation, and census tract. You can zoom in to change the scale and select different geography, or enter a zip code, city, or state to zoom to an area of choice. Clicking on an area will display it’s participation rate to date, compared to the state and national rates.

Data is updated daily, Monday through Friday. Once you click on a particular area, if you click the Track Participation Rate link it will create a widget that you can embed in a website to provide the updated rate. Unlike a lot of the other interactive web maps floating around these days, the bureau does give you the ability to download the actual data behind the map, if you want to do some analysis of your own.


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