Posts Tagged ‘Tutorial’

Update Your Links to the New Baruch Geoportal

Thursday, August 13th, 2015

A few weeks ago I launched a new version of our college’s GIS data repository, the Baruch Geoportal. At the back end I have a simplified process for getting data onto our server, and on the front end we did away with manually updating HTML and CSS webpages in favor of using a Confluence wiki. My college has a subscription to Confluence, and I’ve been using an internal wiki for documenting and administering all aspects of our projects. A public, external wiki for providing our data seemed like a nice way to go – we can focus more on the content and it’s easier for my team and I to collaborate.

Since it’s a new site with a new address, many of the links to projects I’ve referred to throughout the years on this blog are no longer valid. Redirects are in place, but they won’t last forever. Some notable links to update:

The new site has a dedicated blog that you can follow (via RSS) for the latest updates to the portal. The portal also has a number of relatively new and publicly accessible datasets that we’ve posted over the last year (but that I haven’t had time to post about). These include the NYC Mass Transit Spatial Layers series and population centroids for US census geographies. We’ve been creating ISO spatial metadata for all of our new layers, but we still need to create XML stylesheets to make them more human-readable. That will be one of many projects to do for this academic year.

baruch_geoportal

Writing Functions and Building a Jinja Template

Thursday, August 6th, 2015

In previous posts I demonstrated how to pull data from a sqlite / spatialite data to generate reports using Python and Jinja, where Jinja2 is used as a template engine for creating LaTeX documents and the NYC Geodatabase is used as my test case. Up until now the scripts pulled the data “as is”. In this post I’ll demonstrate how I created derived variables, and how I created the Jinja2 template for the report. Please note – instead of duplicating all of the code I’m just going to illustrate the new pieces – you should check out the earlier posts to see how all the pieces fit together.

Aggregating Variables

Aggregating census data is a pretty common operation, and when working with American Community Survey estimates it’s also necessary to calculate a new margin of error for each derived value. I wrote two functions to accomplish this. For each function you pass in the keys for values you want to aggregate, a name which will be the name of the new variable, and a dictionary that contains all the keys and values that were taken from a database table for a specific geography.

#Functions for summing individual values and calculating margins of error
#for individual values

def calc_sums(keys,name,adict):
    tosum=[]
    for val in keys:
        tosum.append(adict.get(val))
    agg=sum(tosum)
    adict[name]=agg

def calc_moe(keys,name,adict):
    sqrd=[]
    for val in keys:
        item=adict.get(val)
        if item=='':
            pass
        else:
            sqrd.append(item**2)
    moe=round(math.sqrt(sum(sqrd)))
    adict[name]=moe

Later in the script, as we’re looping through all the geographies and gathering the necessary data into dictionaries that represent each data table, we call the function. In this example we’re combining household income brackets so that we don’t have so many categories:

for geog in geodict.keys():

    name=geodict.get(geog)
    filename='zzpuma_' + geog + '.tex'
    folder='puma_rept'
    outpath=os.path.join(folder,filename)
    
    acs1dict=pulltab('b_pumas_2013acs1','GEOID2',geog)
    acs2dict=pulltab('b_pumas_2013acs2','GEOID2',geog)

    calc_sums(['INC03_E','INC04_E'],'INC10K_E',acs1dict)
    calc_moe(['INC03_M','INC04_M'],'INC10K_M',acs1dict)
    calc_sums(['INC05_E','INC06_E'],'INC25K_E',acs1dict)
    calc_moe(['INC05_M','INC06_M'],'INC25K_M',acs1dict)
    calc_sums(['INC09_E','INC10_E'],'INC100K_E',acs1dict)
    calc_moe(['INC09_M','INC10_M'],'INC100K_M',acs1dict)

Rather than creating a new dictionary, these new values are simply appended to the existing dictionaries that contain the data taken from each of the ACS data tables in the database. They can be referenced in the template using their new column name.

Calculating Areas

I also want to include the geographic size of the PUMA as one of the report items. Columns for the area are included in the spatial table for the PUMAs – the features originally came from the TIGER files, and all TIGER files have an ALAND and an AWATER column that has land and water area in square meters. So we don’t have to calculate the area from the geometry – we can just use this function to convert the land and water attributes to square miles, and then calculate a total area:

def calc_area(adict,land,water,total):
    landarea=round(adict.get('aland10')*0.000000386102,2)
    waterarea=round(adict.get('awater10')*0.000000386102,2)
    totalarea=landarea+waterarea
    adict[land]=landarea
    adict[water]=waterarea
    adict[total]=totalarea

In the body of our script, we invoke our pulltab function (explained in an earlier post) to grab all the data from the PUMA spatial boundary table:

area=pulltab('c_bndy_pumas2010','geoid10',geog)

And then we can call our area function. We pass in the area dictionary, and what we want the new output column names to be – area for land, water, and total:

calc_area(area, 'LAND_SQM','WAT_SQM','TOT_SQM') 

Like our previous aggregate script, this function appends our new values to the existing table-dictionary – in this case, one called area.

Aggregating Geographies

Our last function is a little more complicated. In all of our previous examples, we pulled PUMA-level data from the American Community Survey tables. What if we wanted 2010 Census data for the PUMAs? Decennial census data is not tabulated at the PUMA level, but it is tabulated at the census tract level. Since PUMAs are created by aggregating tracts, we can aggregate the census tract data in the NYC Geodatabase into PUMAs. Here’s our function:

#Function aggregates all values in a table with a group by field from a
#joined table, then creates a dictionary consisting of column names and values
#for a specific geography

def sumtab(tabname,jointab,id1,id2,gid,geog):
    query='SELECT * FROM %s LIMIT 1' %(tabname)
    curs.execute(query)
    col_names = [cn[0] for cn in curs.description]
    tosum=[]
    for var in col_names[3:]:
        tosum.append("SUM("+var+") AS '0_"+var+"'")
    summer=', '.join(str(command) for command in tosum)
    query='SELECT %s, %s FROM %s, %s WHERE %s = %s and %s = %s GROUP BY %s' %(gid,summer,tabname,jointab,id1,id2,gid,geog,gid)
    curs.execute(query)
    col_names = [cn[0] for cn in curs.description]
    rows = curs.fetchall()    
    for row in rows:
        thedict=dict(zip(col_names,row))
    return thedict

What’s going on here? The first thing we need to do is associate the census tracts with the PUMAs they’re located in. The NYC Geodatabase does NOT have a relationship table for this, so I had to create one. We have to pass in the table name, the relationship table, the unique IDs for each, and then the ID and the geography that we’re interested in (remember our script is looping through PUMA geographies one by one). The first thing we do is a little trick – we get the names of every column in the existing data table, and we append them to a list where we create a new column name based on the existing one (in this case, append a 0 in front of the column name – in retrospect I realize this is a bad idea as column names should not begin with numbers, so this is something I will change). Then we can take the list of column names and create a giant string out of them.

With that giant string (called summer) we can now pass all of the parameters that we need into the SQL query. This selects all of our columns (using the summer string), the table names and join info, for the specific geographic area that we want and then groups the data by that geography (i.e. all tracts that have the same PUMA number). Then we zip the column names and values together in a dictionary that the function returns.

Later on in our script, we call the function:

    census10=sumtab('b_tracts_2010census','b_tracts_to_pumas','GEOID2','tractid','pumaid',geog) 

Which creates a new dictionary called census10 that has all the 2010 census data for our PUMA. Like the rest of our dictionaries, census10 is passed out to the Jinja2 template and its values can be invoked using the dictionary keys (the column headings):

outfile=open(outpath,'w')
    outfile.write(template.render(geoid=geog, geoname=name, acs1=acs1dict, acs2=acs2dict, area=area,
                                  c2010=census10))   
    outfile.close()

Designing the Template

The Jinja template is going to look pretty busy compared to our earlier examples, and in both cases they’re not complete (this is still a work in progress).

I wanted to design the entire report first, to get a sense for how to balance everything I want on the page, without including any Jinja code to reference specific variables in the database. So I initially worked just in LaTeX and focused on designing the document with placeholders. Ultimately I decided to use the LaTeX minipage environment as it seemed the best approach in giving me control in balancing items on the page. The LaTeX wikibook entries on floats, figures, and captions and on boxes was invaluable for figuring this out. I used rule to draw boxes to serve as placeholders for charts and figures. Since the report is being designed as a document (ANSI A 8 1/2 by 11 inches) I had no hang-up with specifying precise dimensions (i.e. this isn’t going into a webpage that could be stretched or mushed on any number of screens). I loaded the xcolor package so I could modify the row colors of the tables, as well as a number of other packages that make it easy to balance table and figure captions on the page (caption, subscaption, and multicol).

Once I was satisfied with the look and feel, I made a copy of this template and started modifying the copy with the Jinja references. The references look awfully busy, but this is the same thing I’ve illustrated in earlier posts. We’re just getting the values from the dictionaries we created by invoking their keys, regardless of whether we’re taking new derived values that we created or simply pulling existing values that were in the original data tables. Here’s a snippet of the LaTeX with Jinja that includes both derived (2010 Census, area) and existing (ACS) variables:

%Orientation - detail map and basic background info
\begin{minipage}{\textwidth}
	\begin{minipage}[h]{3in}
   		\centering
   		\rule{3in}{3in}
    		\captionof{figure}{Race by 2010 Census Tract}
	\end{minipage}
  	\hfill
	\begin{minipage}[h]{4in}
		\centering
		\captionof{table}{Geography}
    	\begin{tabular}{cccc}\hline
		& Land & Water & Total\\ \hline
		Area (sq miles) &  \num{\VAR{area.get('LAND_SQM')}} & \num {\VAR{area.get('WAT_SQM')}} &  \num {\VAR{area.get('TOT_SQM')}} \\ \hline
		\vspace{10pt}
	 \end{tabular}
	\captionof{table}{Basic Demographics}
	\rowcolors{3}{SpringGreen}{white}
	 \begin{tabular}{cccc}\hline
		& \textbf{2010 Census} & \textbf{2009-2013} & \textbf{ACS Margin}\\ 
		& & \textbf{ACS} & \textbf{of Error}\\ \hline
		Population & \num {\VAR{c2010.get('0_HD01_S001')}} & \num{\VAR{acs2.get('SXAG01_E')}} & +/- \num{\VAR{acs2.get('SXAG01_M')}}\\
		Males & \num {\VAR{c2010.get('0_HD01_S026')}} & \num{\VAR{acs2.get('SXAG02_E')}} & +/- \num{\VAR{acs2.get('SXAG02_M')}}\\
		Females & \num {\VAR{c2010.get('0_HD01_S051')}}& \num{\VAR{acs2.get('SXAG03_E')}} & +/- \num{\VAR{acs2.get('SXAG03_M')}}\\
		Median Age (yrs) & \num {99999} & \num{\VAR{acs2.get('SXAG17_E')}} & +/- \num{\VAR{acs2.get('SXAG17_M')}}\\
		Households & \num {\VAR{c2010.get('0_HD01_S150')}} & \num{\VAR{acs1.get('HSHD01_E')}} & +/- \num{\VAR{acs1.get('HSHD01_M')}}\\
		Housing Units & \num {\VAR{c2010.get('0_HD01_S169')}} & \num{\VAR{acs2.get('HOC01_E')}} & +/- \num{\VAR{acs2.get('HOC01_M')}}\\ \hline
	\end{tabular}      
	\end{minipage}
 \end{minipage}

And here’s a snippet of the resulting PDF:

report_inprogress

What Next?

You may have noticed references to figures and charts in some of the code above. I’ll discuss my trials and tribulations with trying to use matplotlib to create charts in some future post. Ultimately I decided not to take that approach, and was experimenting with using various LaTeX packages to produce charts instead.

Looping Through a Database to Create Reports

Tuesday, July 28th, 2015

I’ve got a lot of ground to cover, picking up where I left off several months ago. In earlier posts I presented the concept for creating reports from sqlite databases using Python, Jinja, and LaTeX, and looked at different methods for passing data from the database to the template. I’m using the NYC Geodatabase as our test case. In this entry I’ll cover how I implemented my preferred approach – creating Python dictionaries to pass to the Jinja template.

One of the primary decisions I had to make was how to loop through the database. Since the reports we’re making are profiles (lots of different data for one geographic area), we’re going to want to loop through the database by geography. So, for each geography select all the data from a specific table, pass the data out to the template where the pertinent variables are pulled, build the report and move on to the next geography. In contrast, if we were building comparison tables (one specific variable for many geographic areas) we would want to loop through the data by variable.

In the beginning of the script we import the necessary modules, set up the Jinja environment, and specify our template (not going to repeat that code here – see the previous post). Then we have our function that creates a dictionary for a specific data table for a specific geography:

def pulltab(tabname,idcol,geog):
    query='SELECT * FROM %s WHERE %s = %s' %(tabname,idcol,geog)
    curs.execute(query)
    col_names = [cn[0] for cn in curs.description]
    rows = curs.fetchall()
    for row in rows:
        thedict=dict(zip(col_names,row))
    return thedict

We connect to the database and create a dictionary of all the geographies (limited to 3 PUMAs since this is just a test):

#Connect to database and create dictionary of all geographies
    
conn = sqlite3.connect('nyc_gdb_jan2015a/nyc_gdb_jan2015.sqlite')
curs = conn.cursor()
curs.execute('SELECT geoid10, namelsad10 FROM a_pumas2010 ORDER BY geoid10 LIMIT 3')
rows = curs.fetchall()
geodict=dict(rows)

And then we generate reports by looping through all the geographies in that dictionary, and we pass in the ID of each geography to pull all data from a data table for that geography out of the table and into a dictionary.

#Generate reports by looping through geographies and passing out
#dictionaries of values

for geog in geodict.keys():
    acs1dict=pulltab('b_pumas_2013acs1','GEOID2',geog)
    acs2dict=pulltab('b_pumas_2013acs2','GEOID2',geog)
    name=geodict.get(geog)
    filename='zzpuma_' + geog + '.tex'
    folder='test5'
    outpath=os.path.join(folder,filename)

Lastly, we pass the dictionaries out to the template, and run LaTeX to generate the report from the template:

  outfile=open(outpath,'w')
    outfile.write(template.render(geoid=geog, geoname=name, acs1=acs1dict, acs2=acs2dict))   
    outfile.close()
    
    os.system("pdflatex -output-directory=" + folder + " " + outpath)

conn.close()

The Jinja template (as a LaTeX file) is below – the example here is similar to what I covered in my previous post. We passed two dictionaries into the template, one for each data table. The key is the name of the variable (the column name in the table) and the value is the American Community Survey estimate and the margin of error. We pass in the key and get the value in return. The PDF output follows.

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage[margin=0.5in]{geometry}
\usepackage{graphicx}
\usepackage[labelformat=empty]{caption}
\usepackage[group-separator={,}]{siunitx}

\title{\VAR{acs1.get('GEOLABEL') | replace("&","\&")} \VAR{acs1.get('GEOID2')}}
\date{}

\begin{document}

\maketitle
\pagestyle{empty}
\thispagestyle{empty}  

\begin{table}[h]
\centering
\caption{Commuting to Work - Workers 16 years and over}
\begin{tabular}{|c|c|c|c|c|}

\hline
& Estimate & Margin of Error & Percent Total & Margin of Error\\
\hline

Car, truck, or van alone & \num{\VAR{acs1.get('COM02_E')}} & +/- \num{\VAR{acs1.get('COM02_M')}} 
& \num{\VAR{acs1.get('COM02_PC')}} & +/- \num{\VAR{acs1.get('COM02_PM')}}\\

Car, truck, or van carpooled & \num{\VAR{acs1.get('COM03_E')}} & +/- \num{\VAR{acs1.get('COM03_M')}} 
& \num{\VAR{acs1.get('COM03_PC')}} & +/- \num{\VAR{acs1.get('COM03_PM')}}\\

Public transit & \num{\VAR{acs1.get('COM04_E')}} & +/- \num{\VAR{acs1.get('COM04_M')}} 
& \num{\VAR{acs1.get('COM04_PC')}} & +/- \num{\VAR{acs1.get('COM04_PM')}}\\

Walked & \num{\VAR{acs1.get('COM05_E')}} & +/- \num{\VAR{acs1.get('COM05_M')}} 
& \num{\VAR{acs1.get('COM05_PC')}} & +/- \num{\VAR{acs1.get('COM05_PM')}}\\

Other means & \num{\VAR{acs1.get('COM06_E')}} & +/- \num{\VAR{acs1.get('COM06_M')}} 
& \num{\VAR{acs1.get('COM06_PC')}} & +/- \num{\VAR{acs1.get('COM06_PM')}}\\

Worked at home & \num{\VAR{acs1.get('COM07_E')}} & +/- \num{\VAR{acs1.get('COM07_M')}} 
& \num{\VAR{acs1.get('COM07_PC')}} & +/- \num{\VAR{acs1.get('COM07_PM')}}\\
\hline

\end{tabular}
\end{table}

\begin{table}[h]
\centering
\caption{Housing Tenure}
\begin{tabular}{|c|c|c|c|c|}

\hline
& Estimate & Margin of Error & Percent Total & Margin of Error\\
\hline

Occupied housing units & \num{\VAR{acs2.get('HTEN01_E')}} & +/- \num{\VAR{acs2.get('HTEN01_M')}} &  &\\

Owner-occupied & \num{\VAR{acs2.get('HTEN02_E')}} & +/- \num{\VAR{acs2.get('HTEN02_M')}} 
& \num{\VAR{acs2.get('HTEN02_PC')}} & +/- \num{\VAR{acs2.get('HTEN02_PM')}}\\

Renter-occupied & \num{\VAR{acs2.get('HTEN03_E')}} & +/- \num{\VAR{acs2.get('HTEN03_M')}} 
& \num{\VAR{acs2.get('HTEN03_PC')}} & +/- \num{\VAR{acs2.get('HTEN03_PM')}}\\
\hline

\end{tabular}
\end{table}
\end{document}

test5

In this example we took the simple approach of grabbing all the variables that were in a particular table, and then we just selected what we wanted within the template. This is fine since we’re only dealing with 55 PUMAs and a table that has 200 columns or so. If we were dealing with gigantic tables or tons of geographies, we could modify the Python script to pull just the variables we wanted to speed up the process; my inclination would be to create a list of variables in a text file, read that list into the script and modify the SQL function to just select those variables.

What if we want to modify some of the variables before we pass them into the template? I’ll cover that in the next post.

Inserting Data into Templates with Python and Jinja

Friday, April 3rd, 2015

In this post, I’m picking up where I left off and will cover the different methods I experimented with to get data out of a SQLite database and into a Jinja LaTeX template using Python. I’m using the NYC Geodatabase as my test case.

Standard Elements – Used Each Time

First – the Python script. For each iteration, the top half of the script remains the same. I import the necessary modules, and I set up my Jinja2 environment. This tells Jinja how to handle LaTeX syntax. I borrowed this code directly from the invaluable slides posted here. The only part that gets modified each time is the .get_template() bit, which is the actual LaTeX template with Jinja mark-up that is used for creating the reports.

import sqlite3

import jinja2
import os
from jinja2 import Template

latex_jinja_env = jinja2.Environment(
    block_start_string = '\BLOCK{',
    block_end_string = '}',
    variable_start_string = '\VAR{',
    variable_end_string = '}',
    comment_start_string = '\#{',
    comment_end_string = '}',
    line_statement_prefix = '%-',
    line_comment_prefix = '%#',
    trim_blocks = True,
    autoescape = False,
    loader = jinja2.FileSystemLoader(os.path.abspath('.'))
)
# Modify to specify the template
template = latex_jinja_env.get_template('test1.tex')

The method for connecting to a SQLite database is also the same each time. There are a zillion tutorials and posts for working with Python and SQLite so I won’t belabor that here. Take a look at this excellent one or this awesome one.

conn = sqlite3.connect('nyc_gdb_jan2015a/nyc_gdb_jan2015.sqlite')
curs = conn.cursor()
curs.execute('SELECT * FROM b_pumas_2013acs1 ORDER BY GEOID2 LIMIT 3')

col_names = [cn[0] for cn in curs.description]
rows = curs.fetchall()
conn.close()

First Iteration – Pass Individual Variables to the Template

Here’s the bit that I modify each time. Using the example from the tutorial slides, I loop through the rows returned from my database, and I specify individual variables each time by slicing the elements in the row and assigning them a name which is passed out to the template with template.render(). Then I make a call to LaTeX to generate the PDF file (straightforward since I’m using Linux), one for each row (which represent geographic areas). Each file is named using the unique ID number of the geography, which we grabbed from our row list.

for row in rows:
    filename='zpuma_' + row[0] + '.tex'
    folder='test1'
    outpath=os.path.join(folder,filename)    
    outfile=open(outpath,'w')
    outfile.write(template.render(geoid=row[0], geolabel=row[1], hshld=row[2], hshldmoe=row[3]))
    outfile.close()
    os.system("pdflatex -output-directory=" + folder + " " + outpath)

That’s the Python piece. The LaTeX template with the Jinja mark-up looks like this:

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage[margin=0.5in]{geometry}
\usepackage[group-separator={,}]{siunitx}

\title{\VAR{geolabel | replace("&","\&")} \VAR{geoid}}
\date{}

\begin{document}

\maketitle
\pagestyle{empty}
\thispagestyle{empty}  

\begin{tabular}{|c|c|c|}
\hline
& Estimate & Margin of Error\\
Households: & \num{\VAR{hshld}} & +/- \num{\VAR{hshldmoe}}\\
\hline
\end{tabular}

\end{document}

You can see here where I’m passing in the variables with \VAR – I’m using the same variable names that I created in the script to hold the row elements. I have to do a little bit of formatting to get this to work. First, one of my variables is text description that consistently contains an ampersand, so I have to use replace (a construct from Jinja) to replace & with \& so LaTeX can properly escape it. Second, I want to format my numeric variables with a thousands separator. Here I use a LaTeX construct with the siunitx package, and every place a number appears I mark it with \num. For this to work I always need to know that this variable will be a number; if it’s text or null LaTeX will throw an error and the doc won’t compile (an alternative to using this LaTeX solution would be to use Python’s formatting constructs). My simple output is below.

test1

Second Iteration – Pass Variables to Template in a List

Since I’m going to be passing lots of variables out to my template, it would be tedious if I had to declare them all individually, one by one. It would be better if I could pass out an entire list, and then do the slicing to get what I want in the template. Here’s the Python for doing that:

for row in rows:
    filename='zzpuma_' + row[0] + '.tex'
    folder='test2'
    outpath=os.path.join(folder,filename)    
    outfile=open(outpath,'w')
    outfile.write(template.render(thelist=row))
    outfile.close()
    os.system("pdflatex -output-directory=" + folder + " " + outpath)

And here’s the LaTeX template – in this example I modified the variables a bit.

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage[margin=0.5in]{geometry}
\usepackage[group-separator={,}]{siunitx}

\title{\VAR{thelist[2] | replace("&","\&")} \VAR{thelist[1]}}
\date{}

\begin{document}

\maketitle
\pagestyle{empty}
\thispagestyle{empty}  

\begin{tabular}{|c|c|c|c|c|}
\hline
& Estimate & Margin of Error & Percent Total & Percent Margin of Error\\
Car, truck, or van alone: & \num{\VAR{thelist[171]}} & +/- \num{\VAR{thelist[172]}} & \num{\VAR{thelist[173]}} & +/- \num{\VAR{thelist[174]}}\\
Car, truck, or van carpooled: & \num{\VAR{thelist[175]}} & +/- \num{\VAR{thelist[176]}} & \num{\VAR{thelist[177]}} & +/- \num{\VAR{thelist[178]}}\\
\hline
\end{tabular}

\end{document}

While this is a bit better, the template is harder to read – you can’t really figure out what’s in there as you just have a bunch of list slices. You also have to keep careful track of which indices apply to what element, so you know what you’re generating. I thought I could improve this by creating nested lists where the column headings from the database get carried along, and I could reference them somehow. Then I had a better idea.

test2

Third Iteration – Pass Variables to Template in a Dictionary

I decided to use a dictionary instead of a list. Here’s the Python – since I grabbed the columns back in the database section of my code, I can loop through the elements in each row and create a dictionary by zipping the column names and row elements together, so the column name becomes the key and the row element is my data value. Then I pass the whole dictionary out to the template.

for row in rows:
    thedict=dict(zip(col_names,row))
    filename='zzpuma_' + row[0] + '.tex'
    folder='test3'
    outpath=os.path.join(folder,filename)    
    outfile=open(outpath,'w')
    outfile.write(template.render(d=thedict))
    outfile.close()
    os.system("pdflatex -output-directory=" + folder + " " + outpath)

Now in the template, using Jinja I embed dict.get() for each variable and specify the key (column name) and the output will be the value. This is now highly readable, as I can see the names of the columns for the variables and there’s less potential for a mix-up.

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage[margin=0.5in]{geometry}
\usepackage[group-separator={,}]{siunitx}

\title{\VAR{d.get('GEOLABEL') | replace("&","\&")} \VAR{d.get('GEOID2')}}
\date{}

\begin{document}

\maketitle
\pagestyle{empty}
\thispagestyle{empty}  

\begin{tabular}{|c|c|c|c|c|}
\hline
& Estimate & Margin of Error & Percent Total & Margin of Error\\

Car, truck, or van alone: & \num{\VAR{d.get('COM02_E')}} & +/- \num{\VAR{d.get('COM02_M')}} & \num{\VAR{d.get('COM02_PC')}} & +/- \num{\VAR{d.get('COM02_PM')}}\\

Car, truck, or van carpooled: & \num{\VAR{d.get('COM03_E')}} & +/- \num{\VAR{d.get('COM03_M')}} & \num{\VAR{d.get('COM03_PC')}} & +/- \num{\VAR{d.get('COM03_PM')}}\\
\hline
\end{tabular}

\end{document}

In this case, the output looks the same as it did in our last iteration. Those are some basic methods for getting data into a template, and in my case I think the dictionary is the ideal data structure for this. In going further, my goal is to keep all the formatting and presentation issues in LaTeX, and all the data processing and selection pieces in Python.

Creating Reports with SQLite, Python, Jinja2, and LaTeX

Sunday, March 29th, 2015

For a long time, I’ve been wanting to figure out a way to generate reports from a SQLite / Spatialite database. For example, I’d like to reach into a database and generate profiles for different places that contain tables, charts, and maps. I know I can use Python to connect to the db and pull out variables. I also learned how to use LaTeX several years back when I revised the GIS Practicum manual, and routinely use it for writing reports, articles, and hand-outs.

I finally have time to devote to this, and am going to share what I’m learning in a series of posts. In this post I’ll describe how I got started, and will record some useful projects and posts that I’ve found.

Figuring Out What the Pieces Are

In searching the web for building reports in Python, I’ve discovered a number of solutions. Many people have written modules that are in various states of production, from active to defunct. Prettytable was something I’ve used for generating basic text-file reports. It’s absolutely great at what it does, but I’m looking for something that’s more robust. Of all the tools out there, ReportLab seemed to be the most prominent package that would appear again and again. I’ve shied away from it, because I wanted a solution that was a little more general – if that makes sense. Something where every component is not so tightly bound to a specific module.

Luckily I found this post, which was perfect for helping me to understand conceptually what I wanted to do. The author describes how he automatically generates song sheets by using a programming language (JAVA in this case) to reach into a database and insert the content into a template (LaTeX in this case) using a template engine (Apache Velocity) to produce good looking output. In this case, the template has the shell of a document and place-holders where variables will be passed in from the scripting language and rendered using the engine. He included this helpful diagram from wikimedia in his post:

I started looking for a template engine that would work well with both LaTeX and Python. The author had mentioned Cheetah as another engine, and it turns out that Cheetah is often used in conjunction with Python and LaTeX. After digging around some more, I discovered another template engine called Jinja (or Jinja2) which I’ve adopted as my solution, largely because I’ve found that the project documentation was quite good and there are numerous user examples that I can follow. Jinja2 allows you to do much more than simply passing variables into the template and rendering it; you have the option to run a lot of Pythonesque code from within the template itself.

Putting the Pieces Together

While Jinja is often used for generating HTML and XML (for example), it’s also used for LaTeX (for example). I found that this series of slides was the perfect introduction for me. They’re written in German, but since most of the syntax in the scripting and mark-up languages is in English it’s easy to grasp (and those three-years of German I took way back in high school are now reaping dividends!)

The slides break down how you can use Python to generate LaTeX reports in several iterations. The first iteration involves no templating at all – you simply use Python to generate the LaTeX code that you want (or if you prefer, Python serves as the template generator). The limit of this are obvious, in that you have to hard code variables into the output, or use string substitution to find and replace variable names with the intended output. In the next iteration, he demonstrates how to use Jinja2. This section is invaluable, as it provides an example of setting the Jinja2 environment so that you can escape all of the necessary characters and syntax that LaTeX needs to function. He demonstrates how to pass a variable from Python to render in a template that you create in LaTeX and mark-up with Jinja2 code (slides 18 to 20). He goes on to show how you can loop through lists to generate output.

The third iteration displays how you can pull data out of SQLite and then use Python and LaTeX to generate output. With a little imagination, you can combine this piece with his previous one and voila, you have a SQLite-Python-Jinja-Latex combo. He has a final piece that incorporates screen-scraping using Beautiful Soup, which is pretty neat but beyond my needs for this project.

Now that I understand the conceptual model and I have the four tools I’ll use with some examples, I’m ready to start experimenting. I know there will be several additional pieces I’ll need to incorporate, to generate charts (matplotlib) and maps (perhaps some of the Python modules from QGIS). There are some instances where I’ll also have to write functions to create derivatives of the data I’m pulling, so I imagine NumPy/SciPy and GDAL will come in handy for that. But first things first – I need to get the four basic pieces – SQLite – Python – Jinja2 – LaTeX – working together. That will be the topic of my next post.

Article on Processing Government Data With Python

Thursday, August 28th, 2014

Last month I had an article published in the code{4}lib journal, about a case study using Python to process IRS data on tax-exempt organizations (non-profits). It includes a working Python script that can be used by any one who wishes to make a place-based extract of that dataset for their geographic area of interest. The script utilizes the ZIP to ZCTA masterfile that I’ve mentioned in a previous post, and I include a discussion on wrestling with ZIP Code data. Both the script and the database are included in the download files at the bottom of the article.

I also provide a brief explanation of using OpenRefine to clean data using their text facet tools. One thing I forgot to mention in the article is that after you apply your data fixes with OpenRefine, it records the history. So if you have to process an update of the same file in the future (which I’ll have to do repeatedly), you can simply re-apply all the fixes you made in the past (which are saved in a JSON file).

While the article is pragmatic in nature, I did make an attempt to link this example to the bigger picture of data librarianship, advocating that data librarians can work to add value to datasets for their users, rather than simply pointing them to unrefined resources that many won’t be able to use.

The citation and link:

Donnelly, F. P. (2014). Processing government data: ZIP Codes, Python, and OpenRefine. code{4}lib Journal, 25 (2014-07-21). http://journal.code4lib.org/articles/9652.

As always the journal has a great mix of case studies, and this issue included an article on geospatial metadata.

While I’ve used Python quite a bit, this is the first time that I’ve written anything serious that I’ve released publicly. If there are ways I could improve it, I’d appreciate your feedback. Other than a three-day workshop I took years ago, I’m entirely self-taught and seldom have the opportunity to bounce ideas off people for this type of work. I’ve disabled the blog comments here a long time ago, but feel free to send me an email. If there’s enough interest I’ll do a follow-up post with the suggestions – mail AT gothos DOT info.

Some QGIS Odds and Ends

Thursday, July 3rd, 2014

My colleague Joe Paccione recently finished a QGIS tutorial on working with raster data. My introductory tutorial for the GIS Practicum gives only cursory treatment to rasters, so this project was initially conceived to give people additional opportunities to learn about working with them. It focuses on elevation modeling and uses DEMs and DRGs to introduce tiling and warping, and creating hillshades and contour lines.

topo_contour

The tutorial was written using QGIS 2.0 and was tested with version 2.4; thus it’s readily usable with any 2.x version of QGIS. With the rapid progression of QGIS my introductory tutorial for the workshop is becoming woefully outdated, having been written in version 1.8. It’s going to take me quite a while to update (among other things, the image for every darn button has changed) but I plan to have a new version out sometime in the fall, but probably not at the beginning of semester. Since I have a fair amount of work to do any way, I’m going to rethink all of the content and exercises. Meanwhile, Lex Berman at Harvard has updated his wonderfully clear and concise tutorial to Q version 2.x.

The workshops have been successful for turning people on to open source GIS on my campus, to the point were people are using it and coming back to teach me new things – especially when it comes to uncovering useful plugins:

  • I had a student who needed to geocode a bunch of addresses, but since many of them were international I couldn’t turn to my usual geocoding service at Texas A & M. While I’ve used the MMQGIS plugin for quite a while (it has an abundance of useful tools), I NEVER NOTICED that it includes a geocoding option that acts as a GUI for accessing both the Google and Open Streetmap API for geocoding. He discovered it, and it turned out quite well for him.
  • I was helping a prof who was working with a large point file of street signs, and we discovered a handy plugin called Points2One that allowed us to take those points and turn them into lines based on an attribute the points held in common. In this case every sign on a city block shared a common id that allowed us to create lines representing each side of the street on each block.
  • After doing some intersect and difference geoprocessing with shapefiles I was ending up with some dodgy results – orphaned nodes and lines that had duplicate attributes with good polygons. If I was in a database, an easy trick to find these duplicates would be to run a select query where you group by ID and count them, and anything with a count more than two are duplicates – but this was a shapefile. Luckily there’s a handy plugin called Group Stats that lets you create pivot tables, so I used that to do a summary count and identified the culprits. The plugin allowed me to select all the features that matched my criteria of having an id count of 2 or more, so I could eyeball them in the map view and the attribute table. I calculated the geometry for all the features and sorted the selected ones, revealing that all the duplicates had infinitesimally small areas. Then it was a simple matter of select and delete.
  • Loading Data Into PostGIS – Text Files

    Tuesday, February 25th, 2014

    I’ve fallen out of the blogosphere for quite awhile. Time to catch up – lately we’ve been experimenting with deploying our own instance of Open Geoportal (see previous post) and square one is getting a functioning data repository up and running. I’ve been tinkering with PostgreSQL / PostGIS and am documenting tests in a wiki we’ve created. The wiki is private, so I thought I’d re-post some of the tests here.

    I’m working with a developer who’s installed and configured the database on a server, and I’m accessing it remotely using pgAdmin. I’ve started loading data and running queries and so far I’m relieved that most of what I’m seeing seems familiar, having worked with SQLite / Spatialite for a few years now. I’m using the excellent book PostGIS in Action as my guide. Here’s my take on loading a text file with coordinates into the db and building geometry for it. Loading shapefiles, spatial SQL experiments, and connecting to Geoserver will follow.

    Verify Version

    SELECT postgis_full_version();

    “POSTGIS=”2.1.1 r12113″ GEOS=”3.4.2-CAPI-1.8.2 r3921″ PROJ=”Rel. 4.8.0, 6 March 2012″ GDAL=”GDAL 1.9.2, released 2012/10/08″ LIBXML=”2.7.6″ LIBJSON=”UNKNOWN” TOPOLOGY RASTER”

    Create Schema for Holding Related Objects

    CREATE SCHEMA usa_general;

    Query returned successfully with no result in 297 ms.

    Import Delimited Text File

    Test file is the US Populated Places gazetteer file from the USGS Geographic Names Information Service (GNIS). It is a pipe-delimited text file in encoded in UTF-8 with longitude and latitude coordinates in both DMS and DEC format. http://geonames.usgs.gov/domestic/download_data.htm

    Create Table for Holding Data

    CREATE TABLE usa_general.pop_places
    (
    feature_id int NOT NULL PRIMARY KEY,
    feature_name varchar,
    feature_class varchar,
    state_alpha char(2),
    state_numeric char(2),
    county_name varchar,
    county_numeric char(3),
    primary_lat_dms varchar,
    prim_long_dms varchar,
    prim_lat_dec float4,
    prim_long_dec float4,
    source_lat_dms varchar,
    source_long_dms varchar,
    source_lat_dec float4,
    source_long_dec float4,
    elev_in_m int,
    elev_in_ft int,
    map_name varchar,
    date_created date,
    date_edited date
    );

    Query returned successfully with no result in 390 ms.

    Copy Data From File

    Must be run from the PSQL Console plugin in order to load data from a local client machine. If data was stored on the server, you could use the PGAdmin GUI and use COPY in an SQL statement instead of \copy. When running the PSQL Console on MS Windows the default character encoding is WIN1252. In this example, the data contains characters unsupported by this encoding; the file is encoded in UTF-8 and the console must be set to match. COPY is not a standard SQL command but is native to PostgreSQL.

    — The optional HEADER specifies that the data file has a header column that should be skipped when importing

    \encoding UTF8
    \copy usa_general.pop_places
    FROM ‘C:\Workspace\postgis_testing\POP_PLACES_20140204.txt’
    DELIMITER ‘|’ CSV HEADER

    Basic Query to Test that Load was Success

    SELECT *
    FROM usa_general.pop_places
    WHERE state_alpha=’NY’ and county_name=’New York’
    ORDER BY feature_name

    Create Geometry from Coordinates and Make Spatial Index

    4269 is the EPSG code for NAD 83, the basic geographic coordinate system used by US government agencies.

    SELECT AddGeometryColumn(‘usa_general’,’pop_places’,’geom’,4269,’POINT’,2)

    “usa_general.pop_places.geom SRID:4269 TYPE:POINT DIMS:2 ”

    UPDATE usa_general.pop_places
    SET geom = ST_GeomFromText(‘POINT(‘|| prim_long_dec || ‘ ‘|| prim_lat_dec || ‘)’,4269);

    Query returned successfully: 200359 rows affected, 18268 ms execution time.

    CREATE INDEX idx_pop_places_geom
    ON usa_general.pop_places USING gist(geom);

    Query returned successfully with no result in 8439 ms.

    Basic SQL Query to Test Geometry

    ST_AsEWKT transforms the output of geometry from binary code into the OGC Well Known Text format (WKT).

    SELECT feature_name, ST_AsEWKT(geom) AS geometry
    FROM usa_general.pop_places
    WHERE state_alpha=’NY’ AND county_name=’New York’
    ORDER BY feature_name

    “Amalgamated Dwellings”;”SRID=4269;POINT(-73.9828 40.715)”
    “Amsterdam Houses”;”SRID=4269;POINT(-73.9881 40.7731)”
    “Battery Park City”;”SRID=4269;POINT(-74.0163 40.7115)”…

    Basic Spatial SQL Query to Test Geometry

    Selects the northernmost point in the table.

    SELECT feature_name, state_alpha, ST_AsEWKT(geom) AS geometry
    FROM usa_general.pop_places
    WHERE ST_Xmax(geom) IN(
    SELECT Max(ST_Xmax(geom))
    FROM usa_general.pop_places)

    “Amchitka”;”AK”;”SRID=4269;POINT(178.878 51.5672)”

    Drop Columns

    Drop some columns that have no data.

    ALTER TABLE usa_general.pop_places
    DROP COLUMN source_lat_dms,
    DROP COLUMN source_long_dms,
    DROP COLUMN source_lat_dec,
    DROP COLUMN source_long_dec;

    Query returned successfully with no result in 180 ms.

    pgadmin3

    Creating Reports with SQLite, Python, and prettytable

    Friday, February 8th, 2013

    In addition to providing the NYC Geodatabase as a resource, I also wanted to use it to generate reports and build applications. None of the open source SQLite GUIs that I’m familiar with have built in report generating capabilities, so I thought I could use Python to connect to the database and generate them. I have some grand ambitions here, but decided to start out small.

    Python has a built-in module, sqlite3, that you can use to work with SQLite databases. This is pretty well documented – do a search and you’ll find a ton of brief tutorials. Take a look at this great post for a comprehensive intro.

    For generating reports I gave prettytable a shot: it lets you create nice looking ASCII text tables that you can copy and paste from the prompt or export out to a file. The tutorial for the module was pretty clear and covers the basics quite nicely. In the examples he directly embeds the data in the script and generates the table from it, which makes the tutorial readily understandable. For my purposes I wanted to pull data out of a SQLite database and into a formatted table, so that’s what I’ll demonstrate here.

    Initially I had some trouble getting the module to load, primarily (I think) because I’m using Python 3.x and the setup file for the module was written for Python 2.x; the utility you use for importing 3rd party modules has changed between versions. I’m certainly no Python expert, so instead of figuring it out I just downloaded the module, dumped it into the site-packages folder (as suggested in the prettytable installation instructions under “The Harder Way” – but it wasn’t hard at all) and unzipped it. In my script I couldn’t get the simple “import prettytable” to work without throwing an error, but when I added the name of the specific function “import PrettyTable from prettytable” it worked. Your mileage may vary.

    So here was my first go at it. I created a test database and loaded a table of population estimates from the US Census Bureau into it (you can download it if you want to experiment):

    from prettytable import PrettyTable
    import sqlite3
    
    conn = sqlite3.connect('pop_test.sqlite')
    curs = conn.cursor()
    curs.execute('SELECT State, Name, ESTIMATESBASE2010 AS Est2010 FROM pop_est WHERE region="1" ORDER BY Name')
    
    col_names = [cn[0] for cn in curs.description]
    rows = curs.fetchall()
    
    x = PrettyTable(col_names)
    x.align[col_names[1]] = "l" 
    x.align[col_names[2]] = "r" 
    x.padding_width = 1    
    for row in rows:
        x.add_row(row)
    
    print (x)
    tabstring = x.get_string()
    
    output=open("export.txt","w")
    output.write("Population Data"+"\n")
    output.write(tabstring)
    output.close()
    
    conn.close()
    

    The first piece is the standard SQLite piece – connect, activate a cursor, and execute a SQL statement. Here I’m grabbing three columns from the table for records that represent Northeastern states (Region 1). I read in the names of the columns from the first row into the col_names list, and I grab everything else and dump them into rows, a list that contains a tuple for each record:

    >>> col_names
    ['State', 'Name', 'Est2010']
    >>> rows
    [('09', 'Connecticut', 3574097), ('23', 'Maine', 1328361), ('25', 'Massachusetts', 6547629),
     ('33', 'New Hampshire', 1316469), ('34', 'New Jersey', 8791898), ('36', 'New York', 19378104),
     ('42', 'Pennsylvania', 12702379), ('44', 'Rhode Island', 1052567), ('50', 'Vermont', 625741)]
    >>> 
    

    The second piece will make sense after you have a quick look at the prettytable tutorial. Here I grab the list of columns names and specify how cells for the columns should be aligned (default is center) and padded (default is one space). Then I add each row from the nested list of tuples to the table, row by row. There are two outputs: print directly to the screen, and dump the whole table into a string. That string can then be dumped into a text file, along with a title. Here’s the screen output:

    +-------+---------------+----------+
    | State | Name          |  Est2010 |
    +-------+---------------+----------+
    |   09  | Connecticut   |  3574097 |
    |   23  | Maine         |  1328361 |
    |   25  | Massachusetts |  6547629 |
    |   33  | New Hampshire |  1316469 |
    |   34  | New Jersey    |  8791898 |
    |   36  | New York      | 19378104 |
    |   42  | Pennsylvania  | 12702379 |
    |   44  | Rhode Island  |  1052567 |
    |   50  | Vermont       |   625741 |
    +-------+---------------+----------+
    

    The one hangup I had was the formatting for the numbers: I really want some commas in there since the values are so large. I couldn’t figure out how to do this using the approach above – I’m writing all the rows in one swoop, and couldn’t step in and and format the last value for each row.

    Unless – instead of constructing the table by rows, I construct it by columns. Here’s my second go at it:

    from prettytable import PrettyTable
    import sqlite3
    
    conn = sqlite3.connect('pop_test.sqlite')
    curs = conn.cursor()
    curs.execute('SELECT State, Name, ESTIMATESBASE2010 AS Est2010 FROM pop_est WHERE region="1" ORDER BY Name')
    
    col_names = [cn[0] for cn in curs.description]
    rows = curs.fetchall()
    
    y=PrettyTable()
    y.padding_width = 1
    y.add_column(col_names[0],[row[0] for row in rows])
    y.add_column(col_names[1],[row[1] for row in rows])
    y.add_column(col_names[2],[format(row[2],',d') for row in rows])
    y.align[col_names[1]]="l"
    y.align[col_names[2]]="r"
    
    print(y)
    tabstring = y.get_string()
    
    output=open("export.txt","w")
    output.write("Population Data"+"\n")
    output.write(tabstring)
    output.close()
    
    conn.close()
    

    To add by column, you don’t provide any arguments to the PrettyTable function. You just add the columns one by one: here I call the appropriate values using the index, first for the column name and then for all of the values from the rows that are in the same position. For the last value (the population estimate) I use format to display the value like a decimal number (this works in Python 3.1+ – for earlier versions there’s a similar command – see this post for details). I tried this in my first example but I couldn’t get the format to stick, or got an error. Since I’m specifically calling these row values and then writing them I was able to get it to work in this second example. In this version the alignment specifications have to come last. Here’s the result:

    +-------+---------------+------------+
    | State | Name          |    Est2010 |
    +-------+---------------+------------+
    |   09  | Connecticut   |  3,574,097 |
    |   23  | Maine         |  1,328,361 |
    |   25  | Massachusetts |  6,547,629 |
    |   33  | New Hampshire |  1,316,469 |
    |   34  | New Jersey    |  8,791,898 |
    |   36  | New York      | 19,378,104 |
    |   42  | Pennsylvania  | 12,702,379 |
    |   44  | Rhode Island  |  1,052,567 |
    |   50  | Vermont       |    625,741 |
    +-------+---------------+------------+
    

    prettytable gives you a few other options, like the ability to sort records by a certain column or to return only the first “n” records from a table. In this example, since we’re pulling the data from a database we could (and did) specify sorting and other constraints in the SQL statement instead. prettytable also gives you the option of exporting the table as HTML, which can certainly come in handy.

    Altering Tables in SQLite / Spatialite

    Thursday, February 7th, 2013

    In building the Spatialite geodatabase (see previous post), one of the fundamental things I learned was how to manage table creation and alteration in SQLite, which was quite different from my previous experience working with MS Access and ArcGIS.

    In SQLite, the ALTER TABLE statement is limited to changing the name of a table or adding new columns. If you want to make any other changes, the process is: create a new, blank table that’s structured the way you want, and then write an INSERT statement to copy the data you want from the existing table into the new table. So if you have a table that has a bunch of columns you want to drop or change, create a new table that has your desired structure, then insert what you want into that new table. The same thing goes for primary keys or other constraints. If your existing table doesn’t have a specified key you can’t alter it by specifying one: create a new table that does, then copy your data over.

    Let’s say we have this table (de_data) with basic population data for Delaware’s three counties:

    USPS	GEOID	NAME			POP10	HU10	ALAND_SQMI	AWATER_SQMI
    DE	10001	Kent County		162310	65338	586.179		212.152
    DE	10003	New Castle County	538479	217511	426.286		67.717
    DE	10005	Sussex County		197145	123036	936.079		260.312
    

    And let’s say that we want to change some of the column names, drop the field for housing units, and specify our data types and GEOID as our key. First, create the table:

    CREATE TABLE de_pop (STATE TEXT, GEOID TEXT NOT NULL PRIMARY KEY,
    COUNTY TEXT, POP10 INTEGER, ALAND REAL, AWATER REAL)

    GEOID is the FIPS/ANSI code that uniquely identifies each state. Since these codes may have leading zeros (the codes for all states from AL through CT do), we designate it as text.

    Second, insert the data we want from the existing table:

    INSERT INTO de_pop (STATE, GEOID, COUNTY, POP10, ALAND, AWATER)
    SELECT USPS, GEOID, NAME, POP10, ALAND_SQMI, AWATER_SQMI
    FROM de_data

    Order here matters – it’s going to insert columns from the original table into the new one in sequence: USPS into STATE, GEOID into GEOID, etc. Sometimes it’s possible to use an * as a shortcut to insert and copy everything, instead of listing every field, if both tables contain the same number of columns and they’re in the right order. But this is always a bit risky.

    Lastly, if we don’t need that original table we could delete it:

    DROP TABLE de_data

    SELECT * FROM de_pop

    STATE	GEOID	COUNTY			POP10	ALAND	AWATER
    DE	10001	Kent County		162310	586.179	212.152
    DE	10003	New Castle County	538479	426.286	67.717
    DE	10005	Sussex County		197145	936.079	260.312
    

    The process is similar if we want to take a query or view and turn it into a permanent table. SQLite does support CREATE TABLE AS, followed by a select query, so you can create a table out of a query. However – this is usually NOT the best course of action. If you do this, you won’t be able to specify a primary key for the new table (you really never want a table that lacks a key). Furthermore, if you create a new, calculated field you won’t be able to specify a type for it. This is particularly a problem if you’re working in Spatialite and want to create a spatial view or table that you want to join to some features and map in QGIS. If no type is specified, QGIS won’t know how to handle that new field, and it will be unviewable.

    So, we take the same approach as before. Let’s say we want to create a table with population density as a calculated field. First, create the table:

    CREATE TABLE de_popdens (STATE TEXT, GEOID TEXT NOT NULL PRIMARY KEY,
    COUNTY TEXT, POP10 INTEGER, ALAND REAL, AWATER REAL, POPDENS REAL)

    Then we write our insert statement, and in the insert we create the calculated field:

    INSERT INTO de_popdens (STATE, GEOID, COUNTY, POP10, ALAND, AWATER, POPDENS)
    SELECT STATE, GEOID, COUNTY, POP10, ALAND, AWATER, (ROUND(POP10/ALAND),1)
    FROM de_pop

    SELECT * FROM de_density:

    STATE	GEOID	COUNTY			POP10	ALAND	AWATER	POPDENS
    DE	10001	Kent County		162310	586.179	212.152	276.9
    DE	10003	New Castle County	538479	426.286	67.717	1263.2
    DE	10005	Sussex County		197145	936.079	260.312	210.6
    

    This gives us a new table with density properly typed. Once again, this is only necessary if you want the calculated field to be permanent and function with other objects in the database, and particularly if you want to join this table to a geodatabase feature or shapefile to map the attributes. If you simply want the new field to answer a specific question or to export the data to output, you can just do a SELECT query and save it as a view.

    I also had to do this procedure for every table and shapefile that I imported to the geodatabase. In the Spatialite GUI you don’t have the option to specify a primary key or data types for columns when you do an import; for the latter it takes its best guess. So to get it well-structured, I imported (or created a virtual link), created a new table, inserted the data over, then deleted the original table or severed the link. If it was a shapefile I went through the extra step of activating the geometry (check out the Spatialite Cookbook or the tutorial I wrote for the NYC geodatabase for details).

    Since I was dealing with some enormous tables with hundreds of columns, I used some trickery to avoid typing all the statements by hand. If the data was small enough and came from a spreadsheet, I used a series of concatenate formulas to build the CREATE TABLE and INSERT statements by copying the field names and stringing them together with type names and necessary syntax, so I could just copy and paste a statement into the SQL dialog box. For larger datasets I used Python to do the processing, and had Python grab field names and write statements that I could copy and paste.

    concatentaing

    The import issue was particular to the Spatialite GUI, and not SQLite in general. If you’re dealing with just data tables and use the SQLite Manager (Firefox plugin), it asks you to specify column names, keys and constraints, and types for the columns you’re importing. It does the latter by having you select from a dropdown box for each column – this works fine if you have 10 or 20 columns, but it’s rather tedious if you have hundreds. The Manager also gives you the ability to alter additional elements of the table, like column names, by essentially performing the same operations (create table, insert records, drop table) behind the scenes while holding things temporarily in memory. It prefaces this with a warning message that this operation is not part of the standard SQLite commands, and there’s a chance something could go awry.


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